The drug war south of our border and in our hometowns…

As my regular followers know, my next book that I’ve nearly finished is called “Mexican Heat,” and it’s about Marine Sniper and big-time hero Nick Woods, who gets dragged into a military mission as part of the drug wars in Mexico. (The book is the sequel to “Sold Out,” by far my best-selling book to date, and the one that introduces you into the unforgettable and incomparable Nick Woods.)

I’ve done a lot of research for this book, in the hopes it can be as authentic and accurate as possible. And even well over a year into researching the topic and writing it, I still haven’t grown numb to the mind-blowing numbers and over-the-top acts of terror committed by the cartels and gangs involved in the drug trade.

This article I came across the other day really succinctly puts much of my research into perspective. And it even goes so far as to ask if the war on drugs compares to the atrocities of the Nazi’s in World War II or American Slavery.

Read it if you get a moment. It will help open your eyes to what’s happening just south of our border, and probably in the corner of the very community you live in.

The gruesomeness of the drug trade rivals any atrocities in history.

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Soldier On” follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to survive the final, miserable months of World War II. And, “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after surviving three years of war only to find himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron.

12 Comments

Filed under National security

12 responses to “The drug war south of our border and in our hometowns…

  1. Secure the border. That would solve so many problems.

    Like

    • Yeah, for the life of me, I don’t know why we don’t.

      Like

      • It would seem to be the most common of common sense to have a secure border, but I think the reason we don’t (down south, anyway; up north we seem to have few problems) is because a lot of the people who come over that border will wind up voting a certain way if they are ever given legal status. So it is in a certain party’s best political interest to maintain the status quo.

        Like

        • I wish it were that simple, but unfortunately I think Bush’s 8 years proves that it’s not. (And arguably Reagan’s before that.)

          The truth is that neither Party wants it secure, and I think Republicans don’t want it secure for two primary reasons.

          First, they can complain about it during elections and fire up the base. (Thus, they truly don’t want it fixed, anyway.)

          Second, they know — just like the Democrats — that the big corporations, i.e. their primary donors, actually want the inexpensive/free/off-the-books labor.

          I owned a small business for nine years and a funny thing happened when Obama took office. It’s probably too long a story to tell, but they started enforcing an I-9 rule, which in theory every Republican should support. (It confirms your employees are legal citizens.)

          But they, and the NFIB went nuts about it. They literally wanted to avoid audits because so many of them break the law, which helps lead to them crushing small businesses like mine. (Which by the way, I had to close after nine years — a small factor is that I’m one of the few idiots who actually tried to follow the rules in all instances; stupid me, in hindsight.)

          Sigh. I need to stop. I I HATE both parties. I’m a proud moderate and believe both parties care more about power and scoring points than taking care of this country. I also believe this country is less divided than either party wants to admit… It’s just in both party’s interest to stoke us up and get us pissed at each other all the time.

          Like

          • Oh, and sorry for the long comment, but I wanted to add that I ABSOLUTELY support securing the border immediately. Like yesterday. If we’re supposed to be all scared and worried about terrorists, then let’s declare an act of war against al Qaeda and move several divisions down there immediately until long-term fencing/walls are built. (Same thing up north, next to Canada.)

            Obviously, we can’t afford to do that, just as we can’t afford to police teh globe to infinity. So, it would be nice if our government started making some hard choices and learnign to say “no” on some issues!

            Anyway, thanks for the comment!

            Like

  2. The U.S. isn’t the only country with a portion of the population using drugs. Yet you never hear anything close to the drug violence in Mexico happening elsewhere in the world. I wonder why that is.

    Like

    • At first I was startled by the accuracy of your statement, and then I remembered that Colombia has had it’s share, and Nicaragua, too, if memory serves me correctly.

      And then I thought some more back to when the mob was more active in America, like in the early 1900s during Prohibition, and they were pretty violent, too. Maybe not as gruesome, but at times they were.

      So, it seems that perhaps the thing Mexico is really missing –and Colombia, too — is a serious investigative force like the FBI or DEA. I think bad guys in general, when facing little serious threat from law enforcement, are going to grow the bounds in which they’ll conduct terror operations.

      You think I’m on to something, or am I off the mark? (And it can’t just be religion, because there are some serious Catholics in Mexico and Colombia…)

      Like

      • You’re right about Colombia, can probably put Panama in there. I was thinking Europe. They use drugs over there, and the Afghan heroin has become a problem. I don’t remember hearing about violence on this scale occurring in the neighboring countries due to drug trafficking. Maybe you have.

        Like

Comments are always welcome!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s