The most dangerous job in the world?

I dare you to watch this entire video below… Could you do the job for $15,000?

You have to watch it, all the way to the end.

I did, and it literally nearly made me sick watching it. Just amazing…

One person on the facebook post that this originated from has to go to OSHA classes for climbing and said they show this video in OSHA classes, and that the instructor said a climber makes $15,000 each time he does this.

So, watch the entire video — it gets worse toward the end — and tell me in the comments if you’d do this once for $15,000.  (Don’t just skip to the end. Some of the transitions required in the middle of the video are just unbelievable, as well…)

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after surviving three years of war only to find himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.

13 Comments

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13 responses to “The most dangerous job in the world?

  1. I began hyperventilating about 30 seconds into this video. I currently feel like throwing up.

    • Glad it wasn’t just me! I was beginning to think I wasn’t the man I thought I was…

      • The fisheye lens of the GoPro camera or whatever he’s recording with doesn’t help matters, because it makes the climber look much further away from the rungs/pole than he actually is, and makes those head movements a lot more aggressive.

        • That’s a good point. I may have to go see if there’s a more regular camera that’s recorded them climbing at this height. Maybe it’s not as startling…

          I will say though that the whole time he was climbing, I was thinking of high wire people at a circus. And how they start on a wire like six inches off the ground. And then keep working their way up.

          It’s all a matter of telling yourself, “I’m only six inches off the ground.”

          But at that height? I’m not sure I could…

  2. This is a great job for a free climber, who just love the climb and get paid for it. My thought was ,I hope those welds hold

    • Yeah, I think that was what was scaring me, too. So many of the things he’s grabbing on look so thin and weak. You’re just really counting on a lot of people to have done their job right, and there’s absolutely no room for error — especially with that thirty pound bag swinging around and hooking on things below you.

      Thanks for the comment, Bruce!

  3. I used to work a block from the Sears Tower, and would watch the window washers go up on their scaffolds and clean the windows, and couldn’t believe that anyone would have the guts to do that. But this… this is a whole ‘nother ballgame…

    • Yeah, I agree, John. This has to be at about the highest level you can get.

      And great to hear from you! Hadn’t heard from you in a while. Had to unfollow a ton of blogs, so I miss keeping up with you. (Not sure if you knew, but business was brutal past year and we shut down the business we started nine years ago. Anyway, we’re less stressed and getting adjusted to having a life, but I hate I don’t know the latest from you. If you want to — and have time to — share away. Thanks!)

      • I know about business being brutal. My brother’s company, for whom I worked the last four years, lost the contract they had with a big pharma company, and I lost my job in August. Being lame on one side (stroke seven years ago tomorrow) basically means that I have to work from home 100% of the time, and there are few companies that are willing to take their chances, so I’ve applied for disability to give me some breathing room while I try to make it as a writer full-time. It’s a challenge…

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