U.S. Special Forces struggle with record number of suicides

I wasn’t happy to see this story come across my radar.

U.S. Special Forces struggle with record number of suicides.

The U.S. has almost 60,000 service members across the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps special operations commands and the article lists two primary reasons the suicides are so high:

  • “Members of the closely knit special operations community often fear that disclosing their symptoms will end their careers.”
  • “Additionally, the shrinking size of the U.S. armed forces has put additional pressure on soldiers, whose sense of community and self-identity is often closely tied to their military service.”

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after surviving three years of war only to find himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.

4 Comments

Filed under Marine Corps, National security

4 responses to “U.S. Special Forces struggle with record number of suicides

  1. That’s sad news, Stan. Plus all the killings. Fort Hood had another shooting about a week ago. From what I understand, the shooter had never been in combat. My first duty station was at Fort Hood, and it was one of my favorite assignments. But that was back in 1959.

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  2. Ben Stephens

    Stan don’t forget the serious increase in operations tempo also. These guy are the physical embodiment of the “can do” attitude, so regardless go the pace they get it done. But when the pace stops they have a very different challenge that they have not been adequately prepared to handle.

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    • That’s a really great point, Ben. Sometimes running around and doing things is easier than being forced to contemplate and reflect on things. Thanks so much for dropping that comment!

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