Category Archives: Marine Corps

U.S. Special Forces struggle with record number of suicides

I wasn’t happy to see this story come across my radar.

U.S. Special Forces struggle with record number of suicides.

The U.S. has almost 60,000 service members across the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps special operations commands and the article lists two primary reasons the suicides are so high:

  • “Members of the closely knit special operations community often fear that disclosing their symptoms will end their careers.”
  • “Additionally, the shrinking size of the U.S. armed forces has put additional pressure on soldiers, whose sense of community and self-identity is often closely tied to their military service.”

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after surviving three years of war only to find himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.

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Filed under Marine Corps, National security

Epic Rap Battles: Special Forces vs MARSOC

Okay, if you’re a Marine or spent some time in the Army or military and care about the various special forces units, then you’ll love this video. It’s epic.

But if you’re a civilian and have no knowledge about the fierce competition between the elite units of our armed forces, and if you don’t know any of the hundreds of military acronyms, and if you’re easily offended by profanity or the fact that we still train amazingly talented killers, then just go ahead and skip this. Trust me. You’ll hate it or wonder what the big deal is.

With all the warnings out of the way, I present to you:

Epic Rap Battles: Army Special Forces vs MARSOC

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after surviving three years of war only to find himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.

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Filed under Marine Corps

Blood Brothers, something I’m honored to have, and a song that rocks, as well

I only came across this song by Luke Bryan a couple of weeks ago, but I have been playing it to no end.

Every time I hear it, I think of a couple of friends I hunted with as a boy growing up. And then my mind shifts to the men I served with. Dangerous bars we shouldn’t have been in. Dangerous parts of foreign cities we should have steered clear of. And then our time down range in a bit of a shooting gallery.

But it wasn’t always dangerous. There was sheer boredom. Play fights when we should have been field day-ing (cleaning). Real fights when one of the boys got drunk. Pranks too numerous to count.

I wouldn’t trade anything for those days, and hopefully this song brings back some memories for you. (Man or woman, we’ve all had friends precisely as described in this song.)

Hope you enjoy it, and if you feel so inclined, share a memory or two in the comments.  (Or a similar song that speaks to you.)

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after surviving three years of war only to find himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.

10 Comments

Filed under Fighting and training, Marine Corps, Random posts

An Army officer sums up what makes Marines different

Great post over on Cpl. Beddoe’s site about what makes Marines different. It’s written by U.S. Army Col. Daniel F. Bolger.

Col. Bolger really hits the mark on much of his post. I don’t agree with all of it, but I do agree with most of it.

Here’s the link: An Army officer sums up what makes Marines different.

Love to hear your all’s thoughts in the comments, and hope you all have a great Friday.

Oh, and make sure you end the week strong. Don’t go punching the clock early. (Unless you haven’t punched it early in at least three weeks. Otherwise, lap those around you and either get one step closer to that raise or promotion, or take that next step in earning that big sale or new client.)

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after surviving three years of war only to find himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.

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Filed under Marine Corps

Rest in Peace, Tyler Cone

A fellow Marine shared this on facebook: Rest in Peace, Tyler Cone.

It’s a story that’s unfortunately far too common. A returning vet taking their own life.

If you get a moment, read the short story of his life and try to think of a vet you know. Honestly, there’s almost no one who goes in who doesn’t come back changed and a little messed up.

Or, at least it’s almost always this way with the Marines that I know.

And partly it’s because things are so clear while you’re serving. You’re doing worthwhile work, you have the closest friends you’ll probably ever have, and things are simple. (Not always fun or easy, but certainly simple.)

And when you get out, the freedom and sudden lack of responsibility is a cold, hard slap in the face. You go from being a hero and doing something worthwhile to stocking shelves and dealing with some seriously immature and spoiled people, who just don’t get it. And you’re getting all these questions about what’s it like to serve and it’s just impossible to answer to someone who’s never been there.

Ack. It’s too complicated to get into without writing a novel. Please read about Tyler Cone (link, once again) and then share some love in the world.

To a vet, if you can, but since we’re impossible to approach or help sometimes, help someone who’s just hurting.

That stranger at the gas station who hasn’t taken a bath or shaven.

That weird friend on facebook who’s posting odd and scary posts on their timeline.

Hell, go give ten or twenty dollars to that woman or man who pulls up to a gas pump in a beat-up car and a look of desperation and fear in their eyes. 

Spread some love and good karma, friends. This world can be a cold, hard place.

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after surviving three years of war only to find himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.

12 Comments

Filed under Faith in the world, Marine Corps, Stories about my life