Marine Corps ranked worst service branch to join, and I love it

This article on Yahoo written by Ron Johnson completely made my day. The writer was asked to rank best military branch to serve in.

He ranks them as:

  1. Army
  2. Air Force
  3. Navy
  4. Coast Guard
  5. Marine Corps (Worst Military Branch)

And here’s what he had to say about the Marine Corps:

“Of all the military branches, the Marine Corps ranks as the least attractive choice for this author. Technically part of the Navy, the Marine Corps are the elite war fighters of the United States military. The leathernecks of the USMC are truly fearsome fighters, tough as nails and ready and willing to fight all comers. The Marines turn recruits into stone-cold killers and they make no secrets about that fact. Marines live tough lives, sleeping on board Navy ships, charging through the surf and crawling in the sand with one goal in mind: engage the enemy. Unfortunately, when Marines fulfill their obligation and exit the service, they seem to find difficulty in turning this Marine Corps attitude ‘off’. Whereas an Army or Navy veteran will likely adjust to civilian life over time and become softer, Marines stay Marines. Visit any neighborhood in the United States and you will find a USMC flag flying high over someone’s house. You will rarely, if ever, see a person flying an Army, Navy, Air Force or Coast Guard flag. While veterans of other military branches tend to relax a little bit as they transition into civilian life, any Marine will be quick to remind you of their unofficial motto, “Once a Marine, always a Marine.” I don’t know what those Marine Corps drill sergeants are doing to their recruits, but whatever it is, it works.

“Is that a bad thing? Well, that depends on your reasons for considering a military enlistment. If you have a strong desire to kill the enemy, the Marine Corps is for you because that is what the Marines do. Either you want that or you don’t, plain and simple. If you simply want a challenge, any other branch of the military will provide you with plenty of opportunities to test yourself. Army Rangers and Green Berets, Air Force Pararescue Jumpers, and the Navy Seals all offer extreme physical and mental challenges outside of the Marine Corps. So if you are considering joining the Marine Corps, think long and hard about what that means before going to a recruiter and signing up.”

Here’s the full article and in my opinion the guy is mostly dead on about everything he wrote: The Best Military Branch to Enlist In;  A Veteran Ranks the Military Branches.

And why is it I’m mostly proud of what he said about the Marine Corps? Are we that messed up in the head? : )

Semper Fidelis,

Stan R. Mitchell

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842 thoughts on “Marine Corps ranked worst service branch to join, and I love it”

  1. Family and friends joined the Marines, and I don’t see anything different in them than I did my Army buddies. I think the reason I joined the Army was because of the Army Posters at that time: “Join The Army And See The World!” I really wanted to see the world. Of course, I didn’t know anything about Korea or Vietnam back then (LOL). I sure found out pretty quick. Not to mention Posts like Fort Bliss and Fort Bragg. Hey, there were some good assignments also, three years in France, an assignment to Fort Sam Houston, Fort Hood, Fort Wolters. On second thought, I wouldn’t have been very good on a ship. You can have your Marines and Navy (just kidding fellas).

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    1. Mr. Johnson,

      Really appreciate the comment, and your service to our country. This blog post created some comments on my facebook page, and since you’re a soldier and veteran of the Army, I thought I’d share what I posted there.

      Asked about why Marines are so proud, I wrote this: “As a civilian, I’ve tried to drop this over-the-top Marine Corps pride, because frankly, no one likes a loud asshole. And I’ve also come to realize that anyone who served in any of the branches has done more than those who haven’t.

      “But even with all this said, I think most infantry Marines will tell you that we feel closer to other infantrymen (whether Army or whoever) and combat arms MOS’s than we do other Marines who weren’t infantry. Serving in the infantry and combat arms MOS’s creates probably the tightest brotherhood in the world. I have a good friend from the 82nd Airborne. He thinks most Army soldiers who aren’s combat arms are a joke. To me, being in the infantry as a grunt, or serving in combat arms MOS’s, supersedes all else. But, not all Marines believe this.”

      So, Mr. Johnson, I respect your service in the Army more than I can explain. (Twenty years? Are you kidding me?!)

      But if you spent much time in muddy foxholes or carrying a pack until you were past the point of wanting to cry, then sir I’d come bleed with you any day of the week.

      Sincerely yours,
      Stan

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      1. Hey 0311, your inference is that infantry is the tightest, I presume because you think you see the most danger? Well tell that to the Motor-T guys in Nam as an example…highest percentage of kia of any MOS. You can take your “infantry” attitude and shove it…YATYAS.

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        1. Ummm, nope, Larry, I never said we face the most danger. We’d probably prefer that, actually.

          The truth is that I imagine pilots and air crews on helos and other MOS’s face as much or more danger. I say we’re tight because our jobs suck, as in a capital S-U-C-K. And sometimes our jobs don’t even matter. Othertimes, we’re pawns. And still other times, we’re not even used. (Ever seen the movie Jarhead? Ever spent 18 hours a day running a dishwasher or washing pots on a ship? I have. And honestly, that was one of the worst months of my entire career.)

          Seriously, brother, no offense was intended. Take a couple of breaths and try to not be so defensive.

          Appreciate your service and even your comment. We all faced a lot of shit, we all need to hang together. No one who didn’t serve can imagine what we’ve done or what we’ve been through.

          My comment to Mr. Johnson was not made to offend, but to describe the larger fraternity we all are members of.

          I’ll sign off by saying Semper Fi, since I presume by your charming attitude that you’re a Marine.

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        2. Larry, I spent 4 tours in VN, as a Marine infantry platoon Sgt. I don’t know where you got that information, but it is wrong In war any war the infantry always has the highest casualties. Nature of the game.

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          1. Motor-T??? The chopper guys had a far and away larger percentage of KIA’s than Motor-T. When someone mentions a tight unit it is not because of KIA’s, it’s because of the unit pride and integrity and brotherhood within that unit. Very, very few units get into serious gun fights except the infantry. My 20 years of experience has shown nothing else.

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          2. I do not want to go on record as to what MOS had the highest casualty rate, but, from what I read, the infantry obviously had the highest number of casualties. However, percentage wise, it seems that Armored crewmen had the highest percentage of casualties in relative to man power in that MOS. According to my research it was around 27%. I don’t know how accurate that is since infantry often provided support and were transported by Armored Personnel Carriers. I never served in Vietnam so perhaps I should not even comment;

            Bill

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        3. Motor-T guys with a higher percentage KIA? Not on this planet – in Vietnam or any other war.
          Everyone needs to keep in mind the simple fact that there are only two types of Marines: Infantry and those who support the Infantry.
          Semper Fidelis,
          OG, W-4 (Ret)
          0311/0369/0302

          Liked by 1 person

      2. there are elite Infantry units within the Army such as the one I served in as an 18 year old grunt (11B2p), The 173rd Airborne Brigade (B/4/503rd Inf.) Our tactics were virtually the same as Marine 0311’s. In my opinion now @ 65…stupid! We attacked hills such as 875 @ Dakto, lost beaucoup men including over 30 from “friendly fire” from a Marine Jet who dropped 2, 500 pound bombs on the CP position that held the wounded. A good buddy of mine, Bob Mace served with the Walking Dead” (1/9) and had similar stories to tell. We then abandoned the hills and continued humping the bush looking for more lunacy. The Rangers operated in small units and often ambushed the NVA instead of getting ambushed (Hey, we found ’em!) like we often did.

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        1. Great point, Carl! The 173rd has an amazing reputation — I knew it well even when I was back in High School and deciding which branch to serve.

          And thank you so much for all your years of service!!! (I do hope at least part of that 18 years was in some mechanized unit! lol)

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      3. Your stupid put you d*%* away I’ve saved all branches except coastguard been both blue side and green it’s over let’s not fight about it all of us did our jobs

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      4. I agree Stan, it is hard to talk Marine Corps with an office poag, however the guys in our office were worth every bribe they charged….Our boys ran a tight ship and they knew what they were doing in there…In fact the word “bribe” may be the wrong terminology …..they just wanted part of the money they saved us, they were fair and we all loved those guys…I don’t think I would trade 70’s Marine Corps for anything……ooh rah, Semper Fi Fellas….

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        1. That’s funny you say that Jim…I have been watching some of the old Gene Autry movies …..Shit, now I’m talking like him….thankfully I wasn’t watching him 40 years ago. Lol

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      5. First if you served in the army and not in any of the other branches then anything you hear and say is only based on what someone has told you. You do not have firsthand experience of the other branches unless you have served in them. And as for the things about grunts and combat arms being better that the rest, well you don’t know what you are talking about. if not for the other people you would be lost, wet, hungry, sleeping out in the open, out of ammo, no aircraft to jump out of, no water, no supplies, no close air support when you get in trouble, no medivac choppers to get the wounded out, no transfer orders when it comes time for you to rotate and so on. So you grunts and combat arms should thank all the others. Without all of us you would not survive. Yes you guys are on the front line, but we are the ones that get you there and back. So if you are army don’t try and rate the others, only if you have served in the others should you be able to say what you believe is better. As each branch have its good points and bad points.

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    2. Marines have a tighter bond between each other and the brotherhood along with our traditions are history just stands out. I can just tell a marine is a marine in the civilian life. Semper fi

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    3. I have met some very professional folks both enlisted and officers during my 20 year career in the marines. They were navy, army and air force and they were good at their jobs. However, you never use the word fellas or fellows-that’s like in the old Gene Autry movies where he says follow me Boys. It’s follow me men or just follow me. Depending on weather you’re a general or a squad leader, you refer to your troops as gentlemen, guys or warriors (maybe sometimes, idiots) but never fellas.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Please, Tim. You know my feelings toward your service. My time in the Corps doesn’t hold a candle to your time in Vietnam, but having said that… It is a little sick how proud I am that you respect me.

    They don’t make many men like you.

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    1. I served two tours in Nam with the 1st Marine Division. The Marine Corps Defined my life. I still must always be on time, keep my word, never leave another Marne behind, and love my Country and Corps.

      Liked by 4 people

      1. Mr. Anninos,

        Same thing as I said above. My time in the Corps doesn’t hold a candle to your time in Vietnam, and I really appreciate you stopping by and dropping a comment here.

        SF,
        Stan

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        1. Semper Fi, Brother! Never made it out to Camp Horno, but I’m sure it’s as delightful as most of the other beautiful places the Corps sticks folks! lol

          Anyway, thanks for the comment and your your service, and keep your head down and your spirits up. I assure you, no matter how much you give, you will miss it when you’re out, and you’ll NEVER forget the times you dropped the ball and didn’t hold yourself to the highest standards.

          Believe me on that.

          S/F,
          Stan

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    2. I haven’t been on active duty since 1991, but I still walk the walk and talk the talk. Yes, I fly a USMC flag along with Old Glory. Plt 1005, graduated 2/11/74 MCRD PISC MOS 3002 and 0311.

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        1. Lessee…. I made PFC in May, 1974. I was on sea duty on the USS Simon Lake, 1974-76. Carlos Hathcock was the detachment gunnery sergeant. I don’t recall my DOR for Lance Coolie. DOR for corporal was 11/1/75, DOR for sergeant was 1/1/77. I see I fat fingered my one MOS. I was an 0311 and 0302. My highest rank was O-3. HQMC shows me as captain, USMCR retired. Walt

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          1. Oh my word!!! You served with Hathcock?! That’s amazing!

            And I don’t remember my promotion dates… : ( And there I thought I was squared away…

            Thanks for sharing that, Captain! S/F from Oak Ridge!

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            1. Gunnery Sergeant Donnie Mitchell followed Gunny Hathcock (who was at that time a staff sergeant) as detachment gunnery sergeant. He was awesome too. I learned a lot from Gunny Mitchell.

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              1. Maybe it’s a “Mitchell” thing? J/K. : )

                Love to hear some ole’ war stories if you want to share them and can protect the names. Feel free to share them here or shoot me a private email from my “About Me” page. S/F

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            2. Being a former Marine myself, it will alway’s be Semper Fi till I die. Kohtang Survivor May 15th 1975, Last Battle of the Viet-Nam era.

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              1. Terry,

                Really appreciate the comment and your service. I have an incredible amount of respect for your service, and thank you for handing down a continued lineage that I was so proud to have joined.

                Semper Fi, my friend, and please let me know if I can be of assistance.

                Stan

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          2. I graduated Platoon ans Series Honorman and Series High Shooter, Graduated Sea School in 1974, assigned to the USS Kitty Hawk until 1975, Admiral’s Orderly Com Carrier Group 1 1975, Assistance Brid Warden and Sgt of the Guard, Sea School Instructor MCRD 75 – 77.
            Sgt. Jim Glazener
            Semper Fi brothers

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            1. Dang, Jim! You spent some time on ship!! I managed six months on ship, which was about six months too long… (Though weirdly, you miss being on ship once you’re off. Have no idea why.)

              Anyway, thanks for your service and for dropping a comment. Let me know if I can ever be of assistance.

              Semper Fi,
              Stan

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            1. Great point, Steve. You never hear about sub tenders. Matter of fact, until you mentioned it, I’ve NEVER heard of it. I’ve actually heard more about them in Navy SEAL books, like Richard Marcinko’s.

              Anyway, thanks for your service and for dropping a comment. Let me know if I can ever be of assistance.

              Semper Fi,
              Stan

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