Wait. We fought the Russians in World War 1?! You’re kidding me, right?

I was reading a book about the early days of the FBI today and learned a pretty incredible thing, which was just a minor footnote to the book I was reading. But I was so floored by this detail in the book that I had to fact check it. And then I had to read more about it, just to make sure I wasn’t crazy. (Or that I hadn’t slept through history class.)

Anyway, did you all know that Americans actually fought and killed Russians in World War I? Like, we had troops IN their country? Like, quite a few troops in their country? (13,000.)

Yeah, I didn’t either.

If you have a couple of minutes, go check out this article: The Forgotten Story of the American Troops Who Got Caught Up in the Russian Civil War. Even after the armistice was signed ending World War I, the doughboys clashed with Russian forces 100 years ago.

Americans were outnumbered 8-to-1 in this fighting and lost some good men. Additionally, it was kind of a pre-cursor to the Vietnam War, as the article mentions, because none of the troops deployed there (or Amercians back home) really understood why we were there.

Go check it out, and as always: never forget all of those who served and sacrificed in far-off shores for our country.

Semper Fidelis,

Stan R. Mitchell

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About me: My name is Stan R. Mitchell and I write fast-paced mysteries and thrillers. To date, I’ve written ten books and been really fortunate to have sold more than 70,000 books. If you’re one of those readers, thank you.

Some of my favorite authors and influences are Tom Clancy, Vince Flynn, Robert B. Parker, and Stephen Hunter. If you enjoy reading them, then more than likely you’ll enjoy my writing.

If you’re looking for one of my ten books, try looking here: amazon.com.  #USMC #SemperFidelis

Writers are crazy, and I’m crazier than most.

This map shows what the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine

I don’t intend to post much more about the Ukrainian situation, unless something major happens, but this map/illustration below is an absolute must see if you’re interested in the value, size, and make up of Crimea/Ukraine. (The map is even super-imposed over America to help give you an idea of the size of the place.)

Here’s the map, and believe me it sums up weeks of reading or watching of news: What the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine.

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after surviving three years of war only to find himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.

Some much-needed perspective on the Ukraine situation

Despite all the panic in the media the past couple of weeks — and I confess I fell for some of the worry — the great Soviet Bear is not emerging.

In fact, the Bear is nothing but a cub. (Shocking, I know.)

And if you don’t believe me, spend just a few minutes reading this article, which includes maps and much needed perspective.

Losing our marbles as Putin loses at chess: The cold war is over.

Here are a couple of gems from the article:

[ ] “A little over two decades ago, the Soviet Union was nestled behind a row of pawns that extended into the heart of Europe. It held sway over dozens of client states throughout the world. Today, NATO and the EU extend to the very border of Russia itself. To wit, Poland (a former Warsaw Pact state on the border of the Soviet Union) and the Baltic states (former Soviet republics) are all members of the EU and NATO and have invited U.S. F-15s and F-16s to augment their defenses in response to the crisis.”

[ ] “Putin aspires to a new Cold War and the restored power and prestige that that would imply. Russia, however, is now a shadow of the Soviet Union, contained at the far end of Europe.  … Despite the histrionics from American politicians and European security wonks, Russia is as far from domination of Europe as it ever has been.”

Believe me, take a couple of minutes to read the article. It will lower your blood pressure, guaranteed.

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after surviving three years of war only to find himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.