Category Archives: National security

Improving the U.S. military. Some thoughts from two vets…

Being a prior enlisted member of the military, it’s quite common to spout off your views on all things military. From playing Monday morning quarterback regarding current combat operations, to discussing how the Army or Marine Corps could do things better, nearly every enlisted member that I’ve ever met complains and gripes, while also suggesting how things could be better.

I’ve learned this doesn’t end when you get out, and I’ve of late been increasingly talking all things military with a guy I’ll just call “Lee.”

Lee served four and a half years in the Army, with most of his time in the 75th Ranger Regiment. Lee served two combat tours during that time and he knows about ten times more about weapons than I do, and well, that’s saying something.

Several times in the past six months, we’ve talked about things we’d change if we were in charge and we finally decided it’d be fun to throw these things out there for discussion purposes, and even better, to hear all the other ideas floating around out there.

Here were some ideas we had…

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Filed under Fighting and training, Marine Corps, National security

This nearly brought tears to my eyes

Turn your volume down, get everyone to leave you alone, and take four minutes and watch the entire thing.

Just watch it and think about what you’re seeing.

(My thanks to Stacy Reller for highlighting this and bringing it to my attention.)

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. Please consider subscribing for email alerts of new posts.


 If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after finding himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.

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Filed under National security

Some wisdom about arguing politics, with some great humor, as well

I see some nasty political arguments, and facebook has made such arguments all the more easy.

I’ve seen two totally reasonable people, both of whom I know well, unfriend each other and do everything but curse each other out.

With this nasty divide that’s spreading in our country, I thought I’d share some wise words from author Len Levinson:

I just read a line in a history book, and the line made me think of Facebook. The line was:

“But when you’re in the midst of hot argument, you don’t always present the other side fairly.”

This plays out constantly in Facebook. I’d estimate at least half or two-thirds of posts are political. People misrepresent opposing views so as to better shoot them down. Even I, the very soul of fairness and decency, sometimes get tempted into playing this dishonest game.

Evidently many people feel threatened by dissent, and become desperate to defend certain points of view, or attack other points of view. In their desperation, they believe that anything goes, including cheap shots, vituperation, character assassination, ridicule, omission or distortion of pertinent facts, etc.

We can’t have a better world unless the dialogue is elevated. Instead, the dialogue shows every sign of sinking deeper into the muck. I have no solution. I’m just trying to be a voice for moderation in this increasing immoderate world.

If these words helped you any, maybe consider sharing them with a friend or family member. I continue to worry about how divided we are as a country, and how completely unable we are to even discuss things with someone that we disagree with. (And Congress is even worse.)

Remember the words of Gandhi: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.”

(Note: Being a Marine, it’s nice to have a back up plan. So, if the words of wisdom don’t work, share this video. It should have them laughing so hard they’re crying, and then peace will be restored. The political argument forgotten.)

(Note No. 2: If the laughing doesn’t work, just try some of the moves. It’s for the good of our country, after all. George Washington said he’d approve.)

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. Please consider subscribing for email alerts of new posts.


 If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after finding himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.

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Filed under Faith in the world, National security

ISIS: This too shall pass

Interesting argument below by the Director of Global Security Studies at Johns Hopkins University. He states we don’t need to worry too much about the ISIS in Iraq.

ISIS: This too shall pass.

I’ve got to say, he makes some great points and pulls together a pretty compelling case, in my opinion.

What do you guys think? (And let’s keep the Bush and Obama bashing as limited — and respectful — as possible.)

Keep the faith, my fellow members of Mitchell’s Militia,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. Please consider subscribing for email alerts of new posts.


 If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after finding himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.

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Filed under National security

A Marine veteran of Iraq shares his views of the current situation

As the ISIS moves closer and closer to Baghdad, Iraq descends faster and faster toward all-out civil war.

There have been lots of opinions (or takes) on the situation. From some wanting America to being airstrikes against the ISIS to others wanting us to stay out of it, the rhetoric has been hot and wide-ranging.

I wanted to share parts of a Marine’s perspective on it. (Keep in mind, this Marine served two tours in Iraq…)

“I’ve had my share of anger and disillusionment over the events that have unfolded in Iraq this week. There’s so much to be said about it that I don’t really even know how to express it. I never went to Afghanistan, but between my two deployments, I spent a year of my life in Iraq. Like many Marines and Soldiers that found themselves in that tumultuous little country over the last decade, a small piece of me will forever remain there.”

“I’ve seen a lot of Iraq veterans express remorse over their lost brethren in the country, given the current state of affairs. Many of them feel like it was all for naught at this point.”

“It was the bad war. It was the war that no one wants to take credit for. It’s the war everyone tries to forget.

“Yet myself and thousands of others were there, and we can’t forget.

“I feel disappointment on many levels in these recent events. On one hand, I want to blame ourselves for pulling out too early. On the other, the country of Iraq has simply been mismanaged. It also disturbs me that the Iraqi army and security forces are simply laying down their arms, tossing their uniforms and giving up. It’s a troubling situation all around. Still, at the end of the day and politics aside, it is really the people that are suffering. The ISIS forces have been brutal, and up to 500,000 Iraqis have been displaced from their homes in Mosul alone.”

“… the President just announced that we will not be putting any boots on the ground. More than likely for the best.”

You can read his full thoughts on the matter at: Terminal Lance “Operation Iraqi Shitstorm.”

Keep the faith,

Stan R. Mitchell

Oak Ridge, Tenn.

P.S. Please consider subscribing for email alerts of new posts.


 If you enjoy fast-paced books, you just might like my works. “Sold Out” tracks the life of a legendary Marine Sniper after a CIA unit decides to kill him for reasons of national security. “Little Man, and the Dixon County War” tells the uphill fight a young deputy faces after finding himself in the sights of a mighty cattle baron. And “Soldier On,” a short novel, follows the lives of several German soldiers in a depleted infantry company trying to make it through the final, miserable months of World War II.

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Filed under Marine Corps, National security